Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Living – Why You Need to Invest In Your Health Every Day

Health advice is all around for a good reason. People are pushing their ideas because there is a demand for it. It is more than just interesting material to many people; often it is crucial information we all need to be made aware of.

Your health and well-being become a more relevant issue with each passing day. Nobody is getting any younger, and few of us are preparing for being older. You need to invest in your health every single day. A little goes a long way, especially when you consider the benefits you will gain and the health problems you will prevent.

It is not just about feeling better, being at the right weight, and having the freedom to eat whatever foods you like as opposed to being shackled by hypertension and Type 2 diabetes and their issues and inconveniences. It is about preventing what can…

  • put you in a hospital bed,
  • demand an emergency procedure, and potentially bring about an early death.

First, it starts with your weight. The majority of health problems affecting adults these days has to do with excess body fat. You may think it is trivial to consider as you only put on a “couple” of pounds in a year. The difference this makes may appear to be insignificant. However, at this pace, ten years causes quite a bit of damage. Poor nutrition and an inactive lifestyle add insult to injury.

Consider for the second half of this timeline you have elevated blood sugar, which may be due to prediabetes or perhaps your issue has progressed on to Type 2 diabetes. Now that is a lot of years of damage to your body. You are not getting any younger, and by neglecting your health in this manner, would also mean you will not enjoy good health in later life.

What has been mentioned above is an example, and only some of it may apply to you. Nevertheless, the principle remains. Will you take care of your well-being from today? You need to invest in your health, because if you don’t, you may pay for it dearly…

  • your kidneys,
  • your liver,
  • your heart, even
  • your brain could suffer through a stroke or dementia.

Taking care of your health one day at a time will add up. Even a small detail like…

  • taking the stairs at work instead of riding the elevator or escalator whenever you step outside your office or workplace,
  • skipping your afternoon snack,
  • parking your car towards the back of the car park at the shopping center and walking to the shops instead of parking close to the entrance, and
  • cooking your dinner instead of eating processed food

will make a difference. You can count on it.

Source by Beverleigh H Piepers

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Living – Your Health and Well-Being Have an Expiry Date

We all know our lives are short, that time passes quickly and we often take our time here on earth for granted. However, have you thought about the length of your life in the context of your health and well-being? For if you are not well, your life could become even shorter, time could pass uncomfortably, and you certainly do not want to find yourself in a position of regret because it could be too late.

You may need to start thinking more about your health: this applies to most people, so there is a good chance you are included. We all have areas of our life where we could do better. Your health could be one of them. Paying more attention to your overall health would never be in vain and could only do you well by adding years to your life.

You probably have a good idea of ​​where to start. Alternatively, depending on your situation, where to continue. There is no shame in having come up short in the past, that is as long as you pick up where you left off …

  • perhaps this means you need to start exercising again, only to be more consistent this time.
  • another option could be to make improvements to your food choices.

Maybe this means new lifestyle commitments. Talk to your doctor or someone whose counsel you trust. Figure out a plan for your health and take it seriously.

You do not want to wait until it is too late as your health and well-being has an expiry date whether you like it or not. If you do not take care of yourself, you risk moving this date of expiry to an earlier moment. How produce or a cooked meal "spoils" when left out of the refrigerator where it belongs; your health will eventually "spoil" also when neglected. To some extent, there is only so much you can do, however, why not extend your healthy years as much as you can? Why not add more life to those years by ensuring you are fit for most of them?

Extend the expiry date of your health. It is not beyond your ability. In most cases, you have the power to make a significant difference. Your health and well-being are precious to the quality of your life. Never forget this, and act to make sure this aspect is taken care of.

Get healthy, and live the best life you possibly can. Small changes can make a big difference. Modest and straightforward lifestyle changes will pay off with big dividends.

Source by Beverleigh H Piepers

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Living – Part 2 of Measuring Your Current Lifestyle

There are many ways to measure your current lifestyle. A short list would not be enough, so here is a continuation for you. Take this self-assessment to determine the state of your health. Go over your responses with your doctor to pinpoint areas where improvement are necessary…

1. Do you set caloric limits? Do you set caloric limitations on yourself? If you are trying to lose weight, it may be essential, particularly if you are new to weight loss. It is hard to know how much you are eating if you are not entirely familiar with your caloric requirements and the calories you consume.

Counting calories is not necessary for weight loss but it is beneficial.

2. Do you have an eating schedule? Similar to caloric limits, having an eating plan is not necessary per se. But if you need help getting on track, implementing a diet plan can be helpful.

Barring a few exceptions, two daily meals work for everyone. Decide on two different times to eat, and eat only then. Perhaps it will be lunch and dinner at 7, with no snacks in between. You should not need to eat anything in between.

3. What Is your attitude towards exercise? Your attitude towards exercise speaks volumes. It is even more important than the exercise you do because it dictates how much effort you put in.

Do you view exercise as a way of caring for your body and well-being? Or do you see it as work with temporary benefits? The better your opinion towards physical activity, the more you will look forward to it. Exercise should not necessarily feel like work. It should feel like investing in your health, which makes any effort required more than worth it.

4. How do you eat? Do you eat quickly, or do you take your time? Do you eat your carbohydrates first, or do you focus on proteins? What do you drink with your meals? These questions shed light to how you eat, which could be harming you in ways you are not aware.

You should eat slowly. Save your carbohydrates for last because in all likelihood they are already abundant in your diet. And needless to say, water is better than soda. But do not hesitate to make your juices.

5. What is your motivation to change? Lastly, ask yourself about your motivation. While not directly a measure of your lifestyle, it influences your behavior in more ways than you know. If your motivation to change is fueled by a drive to avoid complications brought on by chronic diseases, you are more likely to succeed than if you would simply like to lose a few pounds. A Type 2 diabetes diagnosis can often be a wake-up call to action. But motivation can also be short -lived.

If you are to succeed with your goals ensure your motivation is not temporary. Remind yourself of the benefits of a healthy lifestyle, and what you have to gain by making changes.

Source by Beverleigh H Piepers

Healthy Food Choices – How to Avoid Heart Disease, Diabetes and Obesity

There is now strong evidence that carbohydrates are the baddies in the war against obesity, heart disease and diabetes. So where does this leave the well established theory about saturated fat and how it not only increases our weight but is also responsible for heart disease?

In a nutshell research is now telling us to do the opposite to what we have been told to do in the past in order to stay healthy. Back in the 70’s when the treatment of cholesterol became popular; doctors took a very simplistic view believing that dietary saturated fat led to body fat. You only have to look around you to see that the eating recommendations that occurred as a result of this theory have had devastating effects upon our health and the prevalence of diseases such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes.

Saturated fat was once blamed for heart, cholesterol and obesity problems and we were encouraged to eat less meat and more carbohydrates (e.g. bread, cereals). But now multiple studies are revealing that this was all wrong! One such 2010 study reviewed the evidence around this subject (Astrup, A. et al, Am J Clin Nutr:2011 Jan 26) and found that “replacing saturated fat with carbohydrates does not reduce the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), and may even increase the risk”. (Dairy Nutrition News April 2011)

The fat that we do need to be concerned about is Trans fat that is found in margarine. The risk of coronary heart disease does is increased with the intake of Trans fatty acids. Trans fats have been made by a heating process that changes the chemical structure of the fat to make it solid but soft. As noted in a previous article, Trans fats are commonly found in commercially produced products especially bakery items.

As well as containing damaging Trans fats processed products such as breads, cereals, pastries, pasta etc. have other health related issues. Because these foods are nutrient poor, a person consuming these foods on a regular basis is likely to be deficient of the important antioxidants. We know that these antioxidants are important for overall health, but they are also significant in the fight against heart disease. This is because it is not the amount of LDL (bad) cholesterol that is the problem, but the oxidation of the LDL cholesterol.

As evidence comes to light about the effects of oxidized LDL, and the problems associated with excess carbohydrate intake, we will no doubt see the list of ingredients in products such as bread, muesli bars and cereals, modified to ensure the continuing sales of these products. Some companies are already adding protein, vitamins and minerals to their products, in the hope that the public will perceive them as “a healthier food choice”. An example of this is new cereals that are coming out with added protein. Given that proteins primarily come from animal sources and that cereals are carbohydrates, the reality is that this will make little difference to our health.

For good health my advice is to:

  • Stick to a fresh, whole food diet. This means avoiding processed carbohydrates such as breads, pasta, processed cereals, pastries and cakes.
  • Aim to achieve the ratios of 40% carbohydrate (including vegetables & some fruit), 30% protein and 30% good fats with each meal.
  • Good fats should include olive oil, coconut oil, avocado, rice bran oil to name but a few. Adequate fat will reduce inflammation in the body.
  • Protein sources should include eggs, meats, fish and small amounts of dairy and nuts. If you are vegetarian you may need to assess whether you are getting adequate protein and consider using a protein shake.
  • Ensure you are getting adequate antioxidants such as vitamin E and C as this is another key to avoiding heart disease and the oxidation of LDL cholesterol.
  • And if a product says “low fat” read the label carefully as you will more than likely find that it has had sugar added to enhance the flavor was lost when the fat was removed.

By adhering to a fresh, whole food diet, much like that eaten by our ancestors, you will achieve better control of your weight and the markers of heart disease and diabetes.

Source by Vivienne C Savill

Diabetes Management: A Healthy Food Guide

According to the International Diabetes Federation estimates, there were about 65 million people with diabetes in India in 2013. Diabetes is the health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Blood sugar is also known as blood glucose; it is a crucial source of energy for the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body utilize the glucose. If insufficient insulin is produced by the body or it does not respond to insulin, glucose accumulates in the blood resulting in diabetes. The body naturally produces blood sugar from the food we eat and stores in the body. Diabetes can be successfully managed by the combination of a well-planned diet and medication. Use websites that provide free nutrition databases and food labels to look up the nutrition information of food. A healthy balanced diet is essential for diabetes management. The food you eat affects your blood sugar, body weight, and heart health. The three major food groups that contribute calories are carbohydrates, protein, and fat.

Among the food groups, carbohydrates have the maximum effect on blood sugar levels. After meals, the increase in your blood sugar level is determined by the amount of carbohydrate in the food. Nutrition data helps you identify the foods that contain carbohydrates and control portion sizes. Examples of foods rich in carbohydrates are rice, bread, roti, naan, cereals, pasta, grains, starchy vegetables (potatoes), dried beans, lentils, milk, yogurt, fruits, juices, sodas, and desserts. Protein is an essential part of your diet but it does contribute calories. Excessive consumption can result in weight gain and increased fat intake. Lean meats, low-fat or non-fat dairy, and plant-based proteins are good choices. Foods that have a high fat content are also high in calories; which can lead to weight gain. Minimizing saturated and trans fats can reduce the risk of heart disease and support improved weight control. Reliable online nutrition databases also provide the fat content of foods.

Weight loss can also help lower blood sugar levels. Regular exercise and controlling calories can help with weight loss. Utilize free calorie counters to plan your meals. Convenient calorie counting apps on mobile phones help you stay on track when you eat out. Work with a dietitian to create personalized meal plans that fit with your insulin or medication dosage and schedule. A dietitian who understands ethnic diets can work with you to set up effective meal plans.

Source by Seetha N

Type 2 Diabetes – Could Probiotics Help With Managing or Reversing Diabetes?

Helpful bacteria live in the human gut and scientists are beginning to explore their possible use for helping to control Type 2 diabetes. These bacteria are known as probiotics and are given as supplements for a variety of illnesses.

In May of 2017, the Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism reported on a study pooling the results of eighteen earlier studies and analyzing them as one large work. A total of 1056 participants were included, …

  • 527 taking probiotics, and
  • 529 not using probiotics.

The study participants taking the probiotics showed lowered …

  • blood sugar readings,
  • insulin, and
  • HbA1c levels.

From these results, the investigators concluded probiotics could be useful for reducing blood sugar levels, insulin levels, and HbA1c levels in people with Type 2 diabetics.

The following month the Journal of Diabetes and Metabolic Disorders reported on a study completed at the University Medical in Yazd and several other research facilities in Iran. Seventy people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes were divided into a treatment group and a placebo group …

1. The treatment group consumed 500 mg per day of supplements containing …

  • "good" bacteria,
  • two types of sugar, and
  • B vitamins.

The bacteria were members of the lactobacillus family, the bifidobacterium family, and Streptococcus thermophilus.

2. The placebo group took capsules containing starch and B vitamins. After nine weeks the placebo group had more albumin in their urine and higher HbA1c levels than the supplemented group. Albumin in the urine is a sign of kidney disease. From this information, it was concluded 500 mg per day of probiotic supplementation over a period of nine weeks could improve blood sugar control and kidney health.

The lactobacillus family of bacteria gets its name from the fact it can break down lactose, a sugar found in dairy milk. Lactobacillus acidophilus makes vitamin K. Some patients use it to treat their …

  • lactose intolerance,
  • diarrhea,
  • vaginal infections,
  • irritable bowel,
  • brain problems,
  • asthma, and
  • high cholesterol,

although the evidence for its effectiveness is sketchy.

The bifidobacterium family is thought by many to be helpful with …

  • irritable bowel syndrome,
  • ulcerative colitis, and
  • ileal pouch (outpouching of the small intestine).

It is also used to promote vaginal health.

Streptococcus thermophilus is used to boost the human immune system and help colon health. It is thought possibly to prevent colon cancer. It is sometimes used with chemotherapy to help protect the digestive system from the treatment. It is also used to replace good bacteria killed off by antibiotics.

Source by Beverleigh H Piepers

Type 2 Diabetes and Healthy Food Choices – What Are The Dirty Dozen of Fruits and Vegetables?

We often hear if we choose to exercise and eat properly, our pancreas will thank us by functioning better and reduce our chances of developing Type 2 diabetes. Many of you watching your health will have heard of a list of produce referred to as the "dirty dozen." What is this list and how do the contents impact your life and your body? The dirty dozen is a term used to describe certain fruits and vegetables, maybe even some of your favorites, impacted negatively by pesticides. The produce listed as the "dirty dozen" are thought to be more heavily contaminated by pesticides than other produce and, as such, it is wise for you to steer clear of them if you are hoping to maintain good health.

Researchers have also connected the ingestion of pesticides as a risk to the developing brain of the fetus during pregnancy and even into early childhood. In 2012, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a report recommending limiting foods containing pesticides in children as much as possible. While it is unfortunate to have to "avoid" fresh fruits and vegetables as they are considered to be very healthy for the body what you do need to remember is when they are contaminated due to the use of pesticides, they will not be doing anything positive for your health. These chemicals will be entering your system, and they may be doing more damage to your body than benefiting your health.

So what are the "dirty dozen list of fruit and vegetables?" The following are the current list to steer clear of …

  • strawberries (these are considered to be especially harmful. Researchers found over one-third of the berries tested contained 10 or more pesticides),
  • spinach,
  • nectarines,
  • apples,
  • peaches,
  • pears,
  • cherries,
  • grapes,
  • celery,
  • tomatoes,
  • sweet bell peppers, and
  • potatoes.

While you can purchase conventional varieties and then focus on washing them well, it has been found a high amount of pesticide residue remains. Therefore, it can be best to make sure you purchase organic produce, provided your budget allows. If your budget does not allow you to buy organic products, then you may want to avoid them entirely.

Many other "conventional" options offer a healthier choice and are deemed to be the "clean 15." These include …

  • avocados,
  • sweet corn,
  • pineapples,
  • cabbage,
  • onions,
  • frozen sweet peas,
  • papayas,
  • asparagus,
  • mangos,
  • eggplant,
  • honeydew melon,
  • kiwifruit,
  • cantaloupe,
  • broccoli, and
  • cauliflower.

As you can see, there are a variety of tasty options to choose from if you want to continue to maintain a healthy intake of fresh produce but limit your exposure to potentially harmful chemicals and pesticides. While we do not instantly notice the side effects and symptoms from taking in damaging chemicals; over the years it does add up and can increase your risk factor for many diseases including cancer. Shop smart, and you will have no problem avoiding this issue!

Source by Beverleigh H Piepers